Home Batteries Tesla Model 3 battery module replacements to cost $5k to $7k, says Elon Musk
Tesla Model 3 battery module replacements to cost $5k to $7k, says Elon Musk

Tesla Model 3 battery module replacements to cost $5k to $7k, says Elon Musk

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The Tesla Model 3 is a car that is built to last. This is something that was highlighted by Elon Musk this Saturday when he discussed some aspects of the Model 3, including its drive unit, body, and battery modules on Twitter.

Quite interesting in Musk’s post was his mention of battery module replacements. The CEO stated that current Model 3 battery modules should last 300,000 to 500,000 miles, which is the equivalent of 1,500 cycles. After this, the battery modules could be replaced, and it will cost roughly $5,000 to $7,000.

Replacing battery modules instead of the whole pack is a pretty clever strategy for Tesla, considering that it saves electric car owners from having to purchase a completely different battery pack once some modules lose their capability to perform optimally. With this system in place, the costs associated with battery replacements will get significantly reduced.

It should be noted that Tesla’s batteries are among the best in the market today. Thus, even batteries that will be removed and replaced from vehicles will likely still be good enough to be used for other purposes. The DIY community will definitely appreciate these modules, as they could be used for energy storage in RVs, as well as electric car conversion kits.

Musk also pointed out that the Model 3 drive unit and body are designed similar to that of commercial trucks, giving them a million-mile life. This is not the first time that the CEO or Tesla mentioned the durability of the Model 3’s drive unit. Last October, Tesla uploaded an image of a pristine Model 3 drive unit on social media. According to the electric car maker then, the drive unit in the image had been validated for over a million miles.

The drive units of electric cars like the Model 3 feature far fewer moving parts compared to an internal combustion engine, making them far less likely to break down. This is something that Tesla has refined over the years, and as shown in analysis from auto teardown experts like Sandy Munro, the Model 3’s drive unit is already smaller, more powerful, and more efficient than the competition.

The same is true for the Model 3’s body. The Model 3 is among the safest vehicles on the road, garnering a perfect 5-star rating from the NHTSA. Part of the reason behind this is the Model 3’s body that uses ultra-high-strength steel and aluminum, as well as its all-electric construction which features generous crumple zones. As could be seen in several accounts of owners following a Model 3 accident, these design elements help the electric sedan protect its passengers.

The Model 3 might only be starting its worldwide ramp, but it is already helping several countries shift away from the internal combustion engine. This was shown prominently at the end of the first quarter when the Model 3 helped Norway sell more EVs than gas-powered cars for the first time, and when the electric sedan became the top-selling car in Switzerland in March, bar none.

Source: teslarati

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Anand Gupta Editor - EQ Int'l Media Network